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Power Rankings, WPSL Southeast Conference – Way Too Soon

Yet another Power Rankings post is here!

Today we travel to the women’s side of American soccer with the WPSL’s Southeast Conference. There’s a good mix of more establshed clubs and recently-expanded sides, so that should make for an exciting 2020 season!

A few of these clubs are in my local area, so I’ll be covering this conference in particular this summer. Expect more Power Rankings during the season from the WPSL Southeast!

Without further ado, here’s the way I’m predicting the regular season will turn out in the first season of the decade.

1) Chattanooga Red Wolves (Chattanooga, TN) – The Red Wolves were just too strong last year for me to predict anyone else to win the conference this summer. They had a fantastic defensive record in particular, allowing just seven goals in their ten matches. That’s hard to come by in the WPSL, so if they keep that up, they’ll be nearly impossible to beat in the Southeast.

2) Memphis Lobos (Memphis, TN) – The Lobos lost a few close ones in 2019, but they were nothing if not competitive throughout the season. They scored plenty of goals and looked pretty strong at times, and I think they have the quality to push for a higher place than last year’s third.

3) Nashville Rhythm (Nashville, TN) – Nashville had a solid season last year, finishing second and producing a strong goal-scoring tally. That was heavily due to star striker Olivia Doak, however, and it remains to be seen whether she’ll remain with the Rhythm this summer after finishing her senior season of college and not being drafted in the NWSL draft she entered last week. If she stays, Nashville will be much more dangerous in the attack and in the Southeast Conference table.

4) SSA Kings (Marietta, GA) – The Kings are brand new to the WPSL scene, but their youth academy has a strong reputation in the Atlanta area for good reason. They’ve also done a good job already of signing some quality talent for the team and not just relying on youth players to fill out the roster. I really feel like SSA could really compete with the best in their opening year if they live up to their potential.

5) North Alabama SC (Huntsville, AL) – Well, their last season wasn’t exactly amazing. They didn’t really have much success on either side of the ball with last season’s squad, and I haven’t seen much from the club to indicate they’re doing something radical to change their fortunes this summer. I just hope they don’t put all their attention and effort toward the new NPSL squad. If they do, they could perform even more poorly than they would have otherwise.

6) Alabama FC (Birmingham, AL) – Alabama just doesn’t seem like a very professional organization at the WPSL level. Last year’s results reflected my assumptions, as the team played underwhelmingly for the majority of the season. I foresee more of the same until the team becomes more about success for the WPSL side and less about an extension of the club’s partner youth system, BUSA.

7) Peachtree City MOBA (Peachtree City, GA) – I’d really love to believe PTC will field a high-quality team in 2020. They’re not far from me and everyone I’ve met at their matches is very kind and welcoming. I’d also like to believe I’ll have a six-pack by the time the WPSL starts up. Neither of those things are very likely, which is very unfortunate in both cases. Maybe MOBA will prove me wrong come summer, but I just don’t see it happening with the same core group of players and coaching staff from last year. It just wasn’t a culture of success on the pitch, and that’s hard to break in a year’s time when your squad isn’t together for 9 months of the year.

As always, and especially with the teams listed here:

Support local soccer, unify those around you, and seek out diversity!

Blessings,

Danny

By danny kotula

danny kotula is an aspiring sports writer and play-by-play commentator. unfortunately, he is not good at either one. his interests include watching soccer and listening to obscure music genres, and those aren’t even his most boring ones. he was born in Tacoma, Washington but has called South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, Texas, California, Georgia, and Costa Rica home over the course of his life. he generally knows where to put a comma, which is by far his most redeeming quality. he is writing this in third person as if he were famous enough for someone to write him a biography, but don’t be fooled. he’s not famous.

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